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Internet Explorer cannot display the Webpage
http://www.vistaarticles.com/articles/125/1/Internet-Explorer-cannot-display-the-Webpage
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Published on 11/23/2006
 
Describes a problem where you receive an error message when you try to access a Web site by using Internet Explorer 7. Describes ways that you can troubleshoot the problem.

Internet Explorer cannot display the Webpage

You can troubleshoot issues that relate to viewing Web pages in Internet Explorer 7 more easily because of the following features: Internet Explorer (No Add-ons) mode
Delete Browsing History
Reset Internet Explorer Settings (RIES)
To troubleshoot issues that relate to viewing Web pages in Internet Explorer 7, follow these steps: 1. Visit a valid Web site. To do this, start Internet Explorer 7, and then type one of the following Web addresses in the Address bar: http://www.microsoft.com
http://www.msn.com
http://www.hotmail.com
If the issue does not occur when you use one of these addresses, contact the administrator of the Web site that you are trying to view. The Web site may be temporarily unavailable.

If the issue occurs when you use one of these addresses, there may be a conflict with another application. In this situation, run the network diagnostics utility by clicking Diagnose Connection Problems on the Tools menu. This tool helps you identify and fix connection problems.

For more information about Network Diagnostics for Windows XP, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
914440 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/914440/) Network Diagnostics for Windows XP is available to help identify and fix network connection problems
If the diagnostics tool does not fix the connectivity problem, examine the log file to determine what failure the tool could not fix. Then, find the appropriate resolution in Section 1 that correlates to the failure. Otherwise, continue to the following steps.
2. Verify connectivity. Make sure that the cables from the computer to the modem are connected correctly and that the modem works correctly.

Note You may have to contact your Internet service provider (ISP) to verify connectivity.
3. Run the Network Diagnostics utility. The Network Diagnostics utility performs several tests on the computer to examine network connectivity. To run the utility, follow these steps: a.  Click Start, and then click Help and Support.
b.  Click Use Tools to view your computer information and diagnose the problem.
c.  Click Network Diagnostics.
d.  Click Set Scanning Options. Click to select every check box except the Verbose check box.
e.  Click Save Options, and then click Scan your System.
Note The scan operations may take several minutes to run.
f.  Examine IP and ISP issues. Use the following guidelines to help determine whether the issue relates to the ISP, to a hardware issue, or to a software issue: Expand IP address. Note the IP address that is listed.
If you have an IP address that resembles 169.x.x.x, Windows has assigned you an automatic IP address (Automatic Private IP address) because your ISP did not provide an IP address. This configuration prevents you from accessing the Internet. In this situation, there may be a hardware configuration issue. Therefore, start troubleshooting by using Section 1. Contact your ISP for more help.
If you do not receive an error message, but you do have an IP address that starts with a number other than 169, you may be experiencing a software conflict or a configuration issue. In this situation, start troubleshooting by using Section 2.
 
 

Section 1: Troubleshooting connectivity issues and network-related issues
Part 1: Power cycle the modem or router
The IP settings that your ISP provides may be misconfigured or may have to be updated. In this situation, power cycle the modem or router to update these settings. To do this, follow these steps: 1. Disconnect the cable that goes from the computer to the modem.
2. Turn off the modem. If the modem does not have a power switch, disconnect the power.
3. Wait several minutes. Then, turn on the modem, connect the cable from the computer to the modem, and restart the computer.
Test your connection again and see whether you can browse the Internet. If you still cannot visit Web sites, continue to part 2.
Part 2: Verify firewall or router settings
If you use a router to connect to the Internet, the configuration settings in the router may have changed, or the settings may have to be updated. To determine whether these issues apply, bypass the router and then connect the computer to the modem or Internet connection. When you do this, we recommend that you use a firewall.

To enable the Windows Firewall in Microsoft Windows XP with Service Pack 2 (SP2), follow these steps:1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel. 
2. Click Security Center. 
3. Click Windows Firewall. 
4. On the General tab, click On (recommended). 
To enable the Internet Connection Firewall in Windows XP without SP2, follow these steps: 1. Click Start, and then click Control Panel. 
2. If you are in Category View, click Network and Internet Connections. 
3. Click Internet Connections, right-click Internet Connection, and then click Properties. 
4. On the Advanced tab, click the Setting in the Windows Firewall group.
5. On the General tab, click On (recommended), and then click OK two times.
A padlock symbol appears next to the connection that you selected. This means that the firewall is enabled for this connection. If you are not sure which connection should be selected, enable the firewall on all connections. Alternatively, contact your ISP to help you determine the appropriate connection.

For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
875356 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/875356/) How to configure the Windows Firewall feature in Windows XP Service Pack 2
After the computer is connected to the Internet, test Internet Explorer 7. If you bypass the router and you can visit Web sites, contact the router manufacturer to help you configure the device. If you still cannot visit Web sites, continue to part 3.
Part 3: Verify that the network adapter is enabled and working correctly
Make sure that the network adapter is compatible with Windows XP. Use Device Manager to verify that the network adapter is enabled and that it works correctly. Update the driver if you have to.

For more information about how to determine whether the network adapter is compatible with Windows XP, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
314062 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314062/) The latest Windows XP Hardware Compatibility List
319908 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/319908/) Information about hardware device drivers for Windows XP
315275 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315275/) Your network adapter does not work and Windows XP does not include a compatible driver for the network adapter
If the network adapter does not work correctly or is incompatible with Windows XP, you may have to contact an independent hardware vendor to purchase a compatible network adapter. If the driver of the network adapter is not installed correctly, you may have to contact the hardware manufacturer to obtain the latest driver update.

To determine whether the network adapter is not installed or is not detected correctly, verify the device in Device Manager. To do this, perform one of the following steps: 1. Click Start, click Run, type devmgmt.msc, and then click OK.
2. Right-click My Computer, click Manage, and then click Device Manager. 
3. Right-click My Computer, click Properties, click the Hardware tab, and then click Device Manager. 
To access Device Manager on a local or remote computer, follow these steps: 1. Click Start, click Run, type mmc, and then click OK.
2. Click File, click Add/Remove Snap In, click Add, and then click Device Manager. 
A Device Manager shortcut is created.

If an exclamation point or a question mark appears next to the network adapter in the Device Manager, double-click the device, and then note the error message that appears. The following list describes three common error codes and provides possible resolutions: Code 10
This device cannot start. (Code 10)
If the device has a FailReasonString value in its hardware key, that string appears as the error message. The driver or enumerator puts this registry string value there. If there is no FailReasonString in the hardware key, you receive this following error message. To resolve this problem, click Update Driver to update the drivers for this device. Click the General Properties tab of the device, and then click Troubleshoot to start the Troubleshooting Wizard. 
Code 28
The drivers for this device are not installed. (Code 28)
To resolve this problem, install the drivers for this device, click Update Driver. This starts the Hardware Update Wizard. 
Code 1
This device is not configured correctly. (Code 1)
To resolve this problem, update the driver by clicking Update Driver. This starts the Hardware Update Wizard. If updating the driver does not work, see your hardware documentation for more information. 
For more information about Device Manager error codes or if you receive an error code that was not mentioned earlier, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
310123 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310123/) Explanation of error codes generated by Device Manager in Microsoft Windows XP Professional
If no exclamation mark icons appear and the latest drivers are installed, continue to part 4.
Part 4: Repair the connection
The connection settings may have to be renewed or may be misconfigured. When you repair the connection, some configuration settings are reset. To repair the connection, follow these steps: 1. Click Start, click Run, type ncpa.cpl, and then click OK. 
2. Right-click the appropriate network connection, and then click Repair. 
3. Test your connection.
For more information about repairing a connection, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
289256 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/289256/) A description of the Repair option on a local area network or high-speed Internet connection
Test your connection again and see whether you can browse the Internet. If you still cannot visit Web sites, continue to part
Part 5: Repair Winsock
These issues may occur if the Winsock registry keys are damaged or corrupted.

Warning Programs that access or monitor the Internet, such as antivirus programs, firewall programs, and proxy clients, may be adversely affected when you run the netsh winsock reset command. If you have a program that no longer works correctly after you follow these steps, reinstall the program.

To repair Winsock on a computer that is running Windows XP with SP2, follow these steps: 1. Click Start, click Run, type netsh winsock reset, and then click OK. 
2. When the Command Prompt flashes, restart the computer.
Note If these steps do not resolve the problem, follow the steps in the next section.
Step 1: Delete registry subkeys
Warning Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly by using Registry Editor or by using another method. These problems might require that you reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that these problems can be solved. Modify the registry at your own risk.Delete the Winsock and Winsock2 registry subkeys. To do this, follow these steps:1. Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK. 
2. In Registry Editor, locate the following keys:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Winsock
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Winsock2
3. Right-click each subkey, and then click Delete.
4. When you are prompted to confirm the deletion, click Yes.
5. Restart the computer.
For more information about Winsock, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
811259 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/811259/) How to determine and recover from Winsock2 corruption
Step 2: Install TCP/IP
Install TCP/IP. To do this, follow these steps:1. Right-click the network connection, and then click Properties. 
2. Click Install. 
3. Click Protocol, and then click Add. 
4. Click Have Disk. 
5. Type C:\Windows\inf, and then click OK. 
6. On the list of available protocols, click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click OK. 
7. Restart the computer.
Test your connection again and see whether you can browse the Internet. If you still cannot visit Web sites, continue to part 6.
Part 6: Reset TCP/IP
TCP/IP may have become damaged or some configurations may have been changed. To reset TCP/IP, follow these steps: 1. Click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK. 
2. At the command prompt, type the following information, and then press Enter:
netsh int ip reset filename.txt
For more information about resetting Winsock and TCP/IP, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
299357 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/299357/) How to reset Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) in Windows XP
Test your connection again and see whether you can browse the Internet. If you still cannot visit Web sites, continue to part 7.
Part 7: Verify the Hosts files
You can use Hosts files to redirect Web site names to IP addresses. Some malicious software such as viruses and spyware can add entries in the Hosts files that can prevent you from browsing.

Note In some cases, legitimate entries are added by system administrators. Alternatively, you may have added entries yourself. If you rename a Hosts file, the redirections in it no longer work. For more information, contact the system administrator or the network administrator.

To determine whether the problem is caused by entries in Hosts files, look for Hosts files on the local computer, and then rename all the Hosts files that you find. To do this, follow these steps: 1. Click Start, point to Search, and then click For Files and Folders. 
2. In the All or part of the file name box, type hosts. 
3. In the Look in list, click the hard disk, and then click Search. 
4. Click all the Hosts files that are found. If more than one Hosts file is found, select them all.
5. Press F2.
6. Type a new name. For example, type oldhosts, and then press ENTER. 
Note the original file name. You may have to revert to the original name if this does not resolve the issue.

For more information about renaming multiple files in Windows XP, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
320167 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/320167/) How to rename multiple files in Windows XP with Windows Explorer
Test your connection again and see whether you can browse the Internet. If you still cannot visit Web sites, continue to section 2.
Section 2: Troubleshooting third-party software and Internet connection settings issues
The following guidelines may help identify third-party software or Internet connections settings that prevent you from visiting Web pages. You can also use the Delete Browsing History feature and the Internet Explorer (No Add-ons) mode of Internet Explorer 7 to troubleshoot these issues.
Part 1: Use the Delete Browsing History feature
To use the Delete Browsing History feature, follow these steps: 1. Open Internet Explorer 7, click Tools, and then click Delete Browsing History. 
2. Next to Temporary Internet Files, click Delete files, and then click OK.
3. Next to History, click Delete history, and then click OK. 
4. Next to Form data, click Delete forms, and then click OK.

Part 2: Use the Internet Explorer (No Add-ons) mode
To use the Internet Explorer (No Add-ons) mode, follow these steps: 1. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Internet Explorer (No Add-ons).

If this step resolves the issue, continue to step 2 to isolate the browser add-on or add-ons that caused the issue. If this step does not resolve the issue, continue to part 3.
2. I the browser add-on or add-ons that caused the issue by using the Manage add-ons feature. To do this, follow these steps: a.  Click Tools, and then click Internet Options. 
b.  Click the Programs tab, and then click Manage add-ons.
c.  Click an add-on in the Name list, and then click Disable. 
d.  Repeat step c until you identify the add-on that causes the issue. If the issue is resolved, you have determined which add-on causes the issue.
 

Part 3: Test Internet Explorer 7 in safe mode with networking
Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE) connections that require a user name and password do not work in safe mode. Most DSL connections and dial-up connections are PPPoE connections. Therefore, these connections do not work unless they are persistent connections to the Internet, such as a cable connection. To start the computer in safe mode, following these steps: 1. Restart the computer. Press the F8 key repeatedly when the screen becomes blank.
2. Click Safe Mode with Networking, and then press ENTER.
3. If you are prompted to select a version of Windows, select the version, and then press ENTER.
4. After the computer has started in safe mode, test your connection.
If you can connect to the Internet when the computer is in safe mode, a third-party utility or program may conflict with Internet Explorer 7. Restart the computer in normal mode and continue to part 4.

If you cannot connect to the Internet when the computer in safe mode, there may be a problem with the network adapter. Return to Section 1. If you have already tried the procedures in Section 1, and the network adapter is working correctly, continue to the following sections.

For more information about safe mode options, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
315222 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315222/) A description of the Safe Mode boot options in Windows XP
Part 4: Restart Windows XP
Warning This workaround may make your computer or your network more vulnerable to attack by malicious users or by malicious software such as viruses. We do not recommend this workaround but are providing this information so that you can implement this workaround at your own discretion. Use this workaround at your own risk.

If you are running a third-party firewall program, a configuration setting may have changed or may have to be updated. Alternatively, another third-party program may be misconfigured and may conflict with Internet Explorer. Follow these steps to identify a conflicting program. 1. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig, and then click OK. 
2. Click the General tab, click Selective Startup, click to clear all the check boxes except the Load System Services check box. 
3. Click the Services tab, and then click Hide all Microsoft Services. 
4. Click Disable all.

Note Antivirus and firewall software may be disabled when you disable third-party services. To keep the computer as secure as possible, we recommend that you enable the Internet Connection Firewall or Windows Firewall before you try to reconnect. See section 1, part 2 for more information about how to do this.
5. Click OK, and then restart the computer.
6. After the computer has restarted, test the Internet connection.
If the connection works, there is a conflict with a program or a utility that loads when the computer starts. To identify the program or the utility that causes the conflict, use the Msconfig utility to troubleshoot connection issues.

Note If you disable all the Microsoft services and restart the computer, the System Restore utility is disabled. You lose all the restore points. Therefore, we do not recommend that you disable all the Microsoft services when you use the Msconfig utility to troubleshoot connection issues.
Check to see whether a third-party service may be causing the conflict
1. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig, and then click OK. 
2. Click the Services tab, enable all the services, and then click OK. 
3. Restart the computer and test the connection again.

If the connection works, continue to the "Check to see whether a third-party program may be causing the conflict" section. If the connection still does not work, a third-party service conflicts with Internet Explorer. To identify the conflicting service, follow these steps:
1. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig, and then click OK. 
2. Click the Services tab. 
3. Enable half the services on the list, and then click OK. 
4. Restart the computer and test the connection.
5. Continue this process until you identify the service that is conflicting with Internet Explorer. We recommend that you remove or disable the service.

Note You may have to contact the developer of the program for information about how to do this.

Check to see whether a third-party program may be causing the conflict
1. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig, and then click OK. 
2. Click the Startup tab.

Because of the number of entries that may be listed, we recommend that you find the conflicting program by using the following process of elimination.
3. Click to select half of the items that are listed, and then click OK. 
4. Restart the computer, and then test the connection.
5. Continue this process until you have identified the conflicting program.
6. We recommend that you remove the program if you are not using it. Or, configure the program so that it does not start when the computer starts.

Note You may have to contact the developer of the program for information about how to do this.
If a clean restart does not identify or resolve the issue, change the settings in the tool so that the computer starts in normal mode.

Note We recommend that you enable Windows Firewall or Internet Connection Firewall before you disable any third-party services. When you disable third-party services, antivirus and Firewall software may also be disabled.
Part 5: Test by using a new user account
If you still cannot browse the Internet, the user account you are using may be corrupted. If you have multiple user accounts, log on as a different user. If this method resolves the problem, we recommend that you create a new user account and transfer your settings and files to the new account. If this method does not resolve the problem, continue to the next step. For more information about how to create or remove a new user account, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
279783 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/279783/) How to create and configure user accounts in Windows XP
If this method resolves the problem, transfer your settings from the old account to the new account by copying the files from the old user's My Documents folder or by using the File and Settings Transfer Wizard. For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
306187 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306187/) How to use the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard with a wizard disk in Windows XP
Warning When you copy files from the My Documents folder, you do not necessarily transfer all the files that you have created or that you use. You may have saved files to a different location. Also, your favorites and your other settings are not transferred when you use this method. We recommend that you verify that all files and settings have been transferred before you delete the old account.
Part 6: Run antivirus software and antispyware software
If you have antivirus software or antispyware software installed, update it and run the software. To download third-party antivirus trial software, visit the following Web site:
http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/downloads/default.mspx (http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/downloads/default.mspx)
For more information about virus software and other malicious software, visit the following Web site:
http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/default.mspx (http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/default.mspx)
After you have determined that the system does not have malicious software installed, test to see whether the problem is resolved. If it is not resolved, continue to Section 3.
Section 3: Resetting Internet Explorer configuration settings
To reset the Internet Explorer 7 configuration settings, follow these steps.

Important When you use the Reset All Settings feature in Internet Explorer 7, you disable all the browser add-ons. Therefore, you have to re-enable the add-ons that you want to use. Typically, an add-on is not re-enabled when you reinstall it. You must manually re-enable the add-on.1. Open Internet Explorer 7, click Tools, and then click Internet Options. 
2. Click the Advanced tab, and then click Reset.
3. In the Internet Explorer Default Settings dialog box, click Reset.
4. When the settings have been reset, click Close, and then click OK to restart Internet Explorer.
Note In Internet Explorer 7, you do not usually have to reregister Internet Explorer files. The Reset All Defaults feature includes an option to reregister Internet Explorer files as a troubleshooting step. If issues are not resolved when you reset Internet Explorer 7, you can also reinstall Internet Explorer 7 to make sure that it is installed correctly.

For more information about how to use Reset Internet Explorer settings, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
923737 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/923737/) How to use Reset Internet Explorer Settings (RIES)
Section 4: Replacing damaged, modified, or missing core Windows files
Part 1: Run System File Checker
This issue may occur if core system files have been removed or replaced. To resolve this issue, run System File Checker to identify missing system files. Then, replace these files. To run System File Checker, follow these steps: 1. Click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.
2. Type sfc /scannow, and then press ENTER.
For more information about System File Checker and Windows File Protection, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
222193 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/222193/) Description of the Windows File Protection feature
Part 2: Run System Restore
If no other steps have resolved the issue, and the problem has only started recently, you can perform a System Restore to restore the operating system to a previous working state.

Note This step may not help identify the issue. However, this step sets the computer to a previous working state. When you restore the system to a previous state, any programs or updates that have been installed since that date are be removed.

For more information about how to restore the system to a previous working state, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
306084 (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306084/) How to restore the operating system to a previous state in Windows XP
Article 306084 provides steps that you can use to undo the restoration if the restore point that you select does not resolve the problem. If the restoration does not resolve the issue, you can select an earlier date as the restore point.